CUBA WINS                   Spanish Translation

90 Miles from the United States Border, Communism is on America's Doorstep

      Time to Free Cuba and Rid our Hemisphere of Communism

                                                                                                                 

Daily Reports For November, 2021

November 21, 2021

Eric Haseltine Ph.D.

Havana syndrome is a collection of baffling neurological symptoms that were first documented in State Department employees in Cuba in 2017--including persistent dizziness, headaches, memory deficits, sleep disorders and mental fog. Thus far, there are 130 acknowledged cases in American officers posted outside the US and two cases inside the US, very near the White House, There are also 26 documented cases in Canadian diplomats. Some published medical studies blame mass hysteria or insecticide exposure, but others point to organic brain damage, such as white matter abnormalities, similar to those present with severe concussions.

Despite the considerable risk Havana syndrome now poses for thousands of American officers overseas, and documented attacks surfacing this year near the White House, the US Government doesn't know how to stop the Havana Syndrome from afflicting more officers. A New York Times article last month quoted a senior US Intelligence official who stated, "As of now, we have no definitive information about the cause of these incidents, and it's premature and irresponsible to speculate."

Sadly, I don’t think this uncertainty of national security officials is strange because, as a former Director of Science and Technology for the US Intelligence Community, and head of Research and Development at NSA, I’ve seen this befuddlement before, on multiple occasions.

A Clue from the Cold War

In my non-fiction book, The Spy in Moscow Station, I describe the confusion, denial and outright hostility directed by CIA and State Department at an NSA officer, Charles Gandy, who had identified both the source of electronic espionage in our Moscow embassy and the means by which the Soviet KGB hid that source from our most sophisticated surveillance detection systems.

It took Gandy more than six years to convince CIA and the State Department of his discoveries, despite presenting incontrovertible evidence from the very beginning. And even with an abundance of evidence, it still required a direct order from President Reagan, who’d grown weary of the Moscow embassy confusion, to give Gandy the freedom to assemble and present all of his proof.

What was the reason for CIA and State Department’s intransigence in the face of overwhelming evidence? Good old-fashioned bureaucratic infighting and blame avoidance. For those agencies to accept Gandy’s findings, they’d have to acknowledge embarrassing failures to detect and stop the devastating leaks from the embassy

Radar Flooding

Since the late 1940s, Russian intelligence has been beaming microwave and UHF signals at our Moscow embassy to collect intelligence from electronic devices. This technique, called radar flooding in the West and high-frequency imposition by the Russians themselves, is capable of retrieving information from microphones and other types of electronics in a manner similar to the way today’s radio frequency ID (RFID) systems work. During his two trips to Moscow, NSA officer Gandy carefully studied the microwave energy beamed into the embassy from KGB listening posts surrounding the embassy.

A 2020 report by the US National Academy of Science concluded that pulsed microwave energy, (which is similar to the radar attacks on our Moscow embassy) most likely caused the brain damage and symptoms of Havana syndrome.

RF Signal Hiding

In Moscow, Gandy also discovered that the KGB was stealthily “exfiltrating” (transmitting from the embassy) data from special bugs planted inside electric typewriters through burst transmissions under “ghost signals” that looked like garden variety artifacts to US bug detection gear, and were therefore ignored by American officials charged with bug sweeping.

Ghost signals are formed in RF receivers, such as bug detection gear, when energy from two very strong transmission sources, such as TV stations, interact in a receiver’s electronics in a manner that creates strong “ghosts” that appear real, but in fact exist only in the receiver, the RF equivalent of optical illusions, if you will.

Thus, when American counterintelligence officers in Moscow saw energy exactly in the region of the RF spectrum where illusory “ghost signals” from Moscow TV stations were located, they assumed, incorrectly, that the signals from the typewriter bugs were normal and innocent (just as the KGB assumed they would conclude).

The Last Piece of the Puzzle

Taken together, radar flooding and RF signal hiding could explain both what type of energy is responsible for Havana syndrome (microwave attacks to collect electronic espionage) and the method the perpetrators used to make those signals very difficult to detect. As with the Moscow embassy bug, those responsible for beaming microwaves at our officers could have chosen frequencies in “ghost signal” regions of the spectrum and thus hidden them using masking signals from TV, radio or other strong RF sources.

But radar flooding signals used in espionage never were transmitted at energies anywhere close to the power required to cause brain damage, let alone even be noticed under normal circumstances.

A 2011 blog post on an open-to-the-public Russian language information security website, bimchik.ru, speculated about the existence of a “viral gun” (high power radar) capable of injecting malware into computers from some distance away as “the next threat to information security.”

The blog author mentioned that such a radar would have to operate at “high power” in order to change ones and zeros in computer circuits to inject malware — perhaps (my words, not the blog author’s) at a power high enough to cause brain damage to anyone unfortunate to be in the radar beam’s path.

How to Catch the Bad Guys

If my conclusions about the source of the Havana syndrome are correct, then we could start to detect the dangerous RF signals by building a special receiver that, like the Russian espionage gear described in my book, filters out innocent ghost signals to reveal the malicious signals underneath. Then, once detected, conventional direction-finding gear might pinpoint the source of the transmissions and lead us to their operators.

Notice I just said “start to detect” and “might pinpoint.” The reason for those equivocations is that Russian intelligence tradecraft (for example) doesn’t rely on just one “hide” (such as masking with ghost signals), but layers many “hides” on top of each other to make it extraordinarily difficult for victims of their espionage to detect attacks.

Charles Gandy uncovered 18 separate “hides” of the Moscow embassy typewriter bug, all of which had to be peeled away to reveal the ultimate truth of Russian espionage penetration of our embassy. For instance, the Russians made their “exfiltration” RF transmissions extremely brief and encrypted them.

Thus, if Russian intelligence is behind the Havana syndrome attacks, it’s highly probable these RF transmissions are being masked with many, simultaneous “hides.” The “viral guns” might be disguised as innocent-looking cameras, for instance, use extremely short bursts of energy contained in very narrow beams that are difficult to detect, even with “ghost” signals eliminated.

The Havana syndrome perpetrator’s use of multiple clever “hides” might explain why US officials have not yet been able to confirm even the existence of a microwave weapon, despite 130 cases of the syndrome in our officers.

So, although we urgently need to catch the bad guys to prevent more Americans and Canadians from suffering permanent damage, the task will not be easy.

And I worry that, on top of the technical difficulties of unmasking “hides,” history will repeat itself, and bureaucratic inertia and infighting will prevent us from mounting a concerted effort to unravel the mystery.

Meanwhile more American officers could suffer the consequences.

November 15, 2021

Lee Edwards, Ph D., The Heritage Foundation

Is Cuba on the edge of a tectonic shift from Castroite communism to Western-style democracy? Until very recently, it would have seemed unthinkable. But when “Patria y Vida,” a music video sharply criticizing the situation in Cuba, becomes the anthem of massive street demonstrations, the impossible starts to sound possible.

Indeed, the demonstrations in Havana and dozens of other cities and the widespread popularity of “Patria y Vida” (“Homeland and Life”) suggest strongly that the Cuban people are fed up with the false promises of communism and are ready for a fundamental change in their politics and lives.

But are all the conditions present for such a dramatic change? One way of determining that is to compare Cuba with East Germany in January 1989 when the communist boss Erich Honecker boasted that the Berlin Wall would stand for another 100 years. In November of that same year, the Wall came tumbling down, and East Germans welcomed a new era of political and economic freedom.

East Germany was ready for a revolution because:

  • It had suffered decades of economic decline and deprivation.
  • Communist leaders admitted they no longer believed in communism, which had served as the ideological raison d’etre for East Germany and the other communist satellites behind the Iron Curtain.
  • Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev announced that Moscow no longer recognized the Brezhnev Doctrine and would not come to the aid of a faltering communist regime.
  • Lutheran pastors sparked the massive public demonstrations that demanded the communist bosses relinquish their power and authority.
  • U.S. and other Western sanctions helped reduce East Germany to the economic level of a third world country complete with rationing of food and clothing.
  • The courageous example of the pro-democracy students in Tiananmen Square inspired East Germans, especially young people, to launch gigantic anti-communist rallies.
  • West Germany presented a compelling picture of how free enterprise and democracy can produce a free and prosperous country.

So, in comparison, what of Cuba today?

Cuba has been in serious economic decline since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, which had provided billions of dollars in subsidies annually to the island nation. For a while, Venezuela under the Chavez/Maduro regime had propped up Cuba, but Venezuela is now suffering more economically than Cuba. As a result, basic goods are strictly rationed year-round in Cuba.

The rising generation does not care about Fidel Castro and Che Guevara and their vaunted “revolution.” What they know is that communism has failed to put bread on the table.

As never before, culture plays a key role in the politics of Cuba. Representative of the new culture is the San Isidro Movement, whose pro-freedom “Patria y Vida” music video has received more than 7 million YouTube visits in a nation of 11 million.

How successful the Cuban people can be when free is proven by the remarkable performance of the Cubans in Miami, one of the wealthiest communities in America. Their success is proof that freedom works.

What then are the differences between the communist Cuba of today and the East Germany of 1989?

Most Cuban communists still cling to Marxism-Leninism and Fidel Castro’s 60-year-old propaganda, a major source of their political power.

Cuban police are willing to use force and even bullets to break up “Libertad!” rallies and demonstrations.

Hundreds of dissident leaders are jailed and separated from the Cuban people.

So, some but not all of the necessary conditions are now present for a Cuban counter-revolution. There are things that the United States and its allies can do to further the cause of freedom and democracy in Cuba.

The U.S. should maintain the economic sanctions against Cuba, for the best of reasons: They expose the inability of the communists to provide the people with basic necessities.

The U.S. should demand the immediate release of Maykel “Osorbo” Castillo and Louis Manuel Otero Alcantara, the leaders of the San Isidro Movement and the artists of “Patria y Vida,” as well as the hundreds of demonstrators who were arrested .

The U.S. should form an international coalition of democratic nations that condemns communist Cuba for its crimes against humanity, past and present, and steps up international pressure for a free Cuba.

It may seem that a Cuba libre is not possible, but we must remember East Germany and the boast of its communist boss that the wall would stand for another century. The widespread July 11 demonstrations including the amazing popularity of “Patria y Vida” signaled that Cuba is at the beginning of the end of the communism that has oppressed it for six decades.

Our Response:

This is not going away. See a good summary of the song Patria y Vida HERE

November 10, 2021

Happy Birthday to World's greatest fighting force. 

On November 10, 2021, Marines across the globe will recognize and acknowledge 246 years of service to their country, the sacrifices made to defend democracy, and the Marine Corps' enduring legacy as America's premier fighting force.

November 6, 2021

Castro and 9/11

In an essay read by a Cuban television presenter on a Tuesday night just before 9/11, Cuba's leader, Fidel Castro continued his onslaught on the United States and encouraged more conspiracy theories. Castro said the Pentagon was hit by a rocket, not a plane, because no traces were found of its passengers.

“Today one knows there was deliberate misinformation,” wrote Castro, who has not appeared in public since July of 2006 when life-threatening surgery for a secret illness forced him to hand over power to his brother Raul Castro.

“Studying the impact of planes, similar to those that hit the Twin Towers, that had accidentally fallen on densely populated cities, one concludes that it was not a plane that crashed into the Pentagon,” Castro said.

“Only a projectile could have caused the geometrically round hole that allegedly was made by the plane,” he said.

“We were fooled like the rest of the planet’s inhabitants,” he wrote.

Castro said the truth behind the September 11 attacks with hijacked planes that killed nearly 3,000 people will probably never be known.

Castro’s 4,256-word essay made no mention of Osama bin Laden and his militant Islamist al Qaeda network behind the attacks on New York’s World Trade Center and Washington.

Castro, who was the target of CIA assassination plots after his 1959 revolution, said Cuba tipped off U.S. security services in 1984 about a plan to kill then President Ronald Reagan while he campaigned for re-election in North Carolina.

The information provided by Cuba led to the arrest of a group of would-be assassins and foiled the plot, he wrote.

Our Response:

Castro was single-minded in his hatred of America and never stopped to his dying breath

November 5, 2021

Next Demonstration - November 15

Gerardo Hernández Nordelo, the head of Cuba’s “Committees for the Defense of the Revolution” (CDR), warned anti-communist dissidents at an event this week that the totalitarian regime would defend itself “at whatever price necessary.”

The CDR are grassroots espionage organizations that operate by appointing chivatos (snitches), as Cubans tend to refer to them as, on every block of every neighborhood in the country. These individuals are tasked with monitoring the speech and activities of every person living around them and notifying the communist regime if anyone appears to exhibit displeasure with the Castro family or the political system.

Hernández became the head of the CDR after President Barack Obama released him from prison in 2014. In the United States, Hernández was a member of an espionage group that came to be known as the “Cuban Five” whose operation directly led to the murder of four U.S. citizens. Hernández infiltrated an anti-communist charity in Florida known as “Brothers to the Rescue” that organized rescue flights in the Caribbean in the 1990s, meant to save wayward refugees on rafts. The Cuban military shot down four American members of the group in 1996; Hernández was the only person to serve time for their killings.

Prior to Obama’s scandalous decision to release Hernández, the Obama administration paid to ship Hernández’s sperm to Cuba so that he could sire a child with his wife while still in prison.

The Castro regime has branded Hernández a “hero of the Revolution” since his return.

The event this week was a celebration of the work of a low-level spy the regime identified as “Agent Fernando,” a self-proclaimed doctor who had allegedly infiltrated the dissident group planning a peaceful nationwide protest on November 15. “Agent Fernando” accused a dissident protest organizer, Yunier García, of seeking a violent confrontation between civilians and the Cuban military. García confirmed that he knew “Agent Fernando” and that the man had seemed suspicious at all times, leading opponents of the regime not to trust him. He also mocked the use of the term “agent” for an individual he said was more of a freelance “informant” to the regime than an official spy.
At the event on Tuesday, Hernández threatened dissident groups by asserting that the regime was unmasking “Agent Fernando” as a warning that it has so many spies in the ranks of anti-communist groups that it can afford to do so.

“They underestimate the revolutionary people who, despite the fact that we know we have problems, that we have to resolve them, we don’t want the peace that we count on in our streets to be robbed from us,” Hernández said. “[That] citizen’s calm that we have enjoyed for over 60 years … we are going to defend that at the price that is necessary.”

There are many Fernandos in this population, don’t doubt it,” he asserted.

“Fernando” delivered a brief speech in which he claimed to be a child oncologist and claimed that Cuba often runs out of chemotherapy medications “because the enemy of the north [the United States] denies it to us.” In reality, the American economic sanctions on Cuba do not cover medical or humanitarian supplies.

“The U.S. embargo allows humanitarian goods to reach Cuba, and the U.S. government expedites requests to export humanitarian or medical supplies to Cuba,” the State Department clarified this year.

Hernández awarded “Fernando” for his efforts with a giant poster of Fidel Castro.

The Cuban dissident community has largely shrugged off the big reveal. García, the protest organizer that “Agent Fernando” accused of seeking violent military action, said in a post on Facebook that he was “not surprised” the man was a chivato given his suspicious behavior.

“I frankly think they are exaggerating by calling him an ‘agent.’ For me, he was more like some sort of informant,” García said.

Another anti-communist activist, biologist Ariel Ruiz Urquiola, revealed in a livestream that he had met “Agent Fernando” while engaging in a hunger strike in 2016 to demand the regime give medical care to his sister, Omara Ruiz Urquiola, who was in need of cancer treatment. Ruiz Urquiola said that the spy approached him pretending to be a doctor concerned about his health and told him to call off the strike, asserting, “you won’t achieve anything.” Ruiz Urquiola referred to him in the livestream this week as an obvious “henchman.”

The Castro regime has escalated its violence against anti-communists and suspected enablers, including apolitical family members, in the aftermath of the July 11 protests across the island. An estimated 187,000 Cubans took the streets that day demanding freedom from communism, peacefully assembling and chanting slogans against the regime. Castro state security spent the following days violently repressing dissidents, breaking into homes and shooting unarmed civilians without cause and disappearing suspected protesters into the political prisoner system.

Last month, Cuba posted a variety of propaganda videos online showing armed civilians practicing what appeared to be an attack on a guerrilla force. Many of them carried firearms despite the fact that private gun ownership is illegal in the country.

Hernández announced the CDRs would launch a “Popular Revolutionary Vigilance Detail body” to pressure civilians to alert authorities if their neighbors appeared to possess illegal political thoughts – or, as the regime put it, “foster denunciations” of “counterrevolutionaries.”

Dissidents have called for another round of nationwide protests on November 15 followed by a “national strike” to cut profits to the Castro regime and prevent it from functioning.

November 3, 2021

National Liberation Day - January 1, Removal of Batista

In March 1952, Fulgencio Batista had led a military coup in Cuba, installing himself as president, supported financially and militarily by the United States of America. Under his dictatorship, Batista revoked most political liberties, including the right to strike.

Fidel Castro was a lawyer with strong communist views. He had participated in the elections that were cancelled due to Batista's coup. Castro viewed Batista as an oppressive dictator in the pocket of the US and had begun training rebels with the aim of removing Batista.

In 1955, Castro was exiled to Mexico for his involvement in the failed July 1953 rebellion. In 1956, Castro returned and from his base in the Sierra Maestra mountains, he began a guerrilla war, aided by Che Guevara.

While not winning any decisive victories, the tide was clearly turning against Batista and the Americans, unable to persuade Batista to leave voluntarily, withdrew military support in 1958.

An emboldened Castro then led his 9,000-strong guerrilla army into Havana on January 1st 1959. Batista fled to the Dominican Republic, before eventually finding exile in Portugal.

Fidel Castro then became prime minister, with his brother, Raul, as his deputy and Guevara as his third in command.

Our Response:

It all started so simply. Had the Dictator Batista resigned from office and new elections taken place, Castro would never have had the backing of the Cuban people. Fate always plays a role. 

November 2, 2021

Lee Edwards, Ph D., The Heritage Foundation

Is Cuba on the edge of a tectonic shift from Castroite communism to Western-style democracy? Until very recently, it would have seemed unthinkable. But when “Patria y Vida,” a music video sharply criticizing the situation in Cuba, becomes the anthem of massive street demonstrations, the impossible starts to sound possible.

Indeed, the demonstrations in Havana and dozens of other cities and the widespread popularity of “Patria y Vida” (“Homeland and Life”) suggest strongly that the Cuban people are fed up with the false promises of communism and are ready for a fundamental change in their politics and lives.

But are all the conditions present for such a dramatic change? One way of determining that is to compare Cuba with East Germany in January 1989 when the communist boss Erich Honecker boasted that the Berlin Wall would stand for another 100 years. In November of that same year, the Wall came tumbling down, and East Germans welcomed a new era of political and economic freedom.

East Germany was ready for a revolution because:

  • It had suffered decades of economic decline and deprivation.
  • Communist leaders admitted they no longer believed in communism, which had served as the ideological raison d’etre for East Germany and the other communist satellites behind the Iron Curtain.
  • Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev announced that Moscow no longer recognized the Brezhnev Doctrine and would not come to the aid of a faltering communist regime.
  • Lutheran pastors sparked the massive public demonstrations that demanded the communist bosses relinquish their power and authority.
  • U.S. and other Western sanctions helped reduce East Germany to the economic level of a third world country complete with rationing of food and clothing.
  • The courageous example of the pro-democracy students in Tiananmen Square inspired East Germans, especially young people, to launch gigantic anti-communist rallies.
  • West Germany presented a compelling picture of how free enterprise and democracy can produce a free and prosperous country.

So, in comparison, what of Cuba today?

Cuba has been in serious economic decline since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, which had provided billions of dollars in subsidies annually to the island nation. For a while, Venezuela under the Chavez/Maduro regime had propped up Cuba, but Venezuela is now suffering more economically than Cuba. As a result, basic goods are strictly rationed year-round in Cuba.

The rising generation does not care about Fidel Castro and Che Guevara and their vaunted “revolution.” What they know is that communism has failed to put bread on the table.

As never before, culture plays a key role in the politics of Cuba. Representative of the new culture is the San Isidro Movement, whose pro-freedom “Patria y Vida” music video has received more than 7 million YouTube visits in a nation of 11 million.

How successful the Cuban people can be when free is proven by the remarkable performance of the Cubans in Miami, one of the wealthiest communities in America. Their success is proof that freedom works.

What then are the differences between the communist Cuba of today and the East Germany of 1989?

Most Cuban communists still cling to Marxism-Leninism and Fidel Castro’s 60-year-old propaganda, a major source of their political power.

Cuban police are willing to use force and even bullets to break up “Libertad!” rallies and demonstrations.

Hundreds of dissident leaders are jailed and separated from the Cuban people.

So, some but not all of the necessary conditions are now present for a Cuban counter-revolution. There are things that the United States and its allies can do to further the cause of freedom and democracy in Cuba.

The U.S. should maintain the economic sanctions against Cuba, for the best of reasons: They expose the inability of the communists to provide the people with basic necessities.

The U.S. should demand the immediate release of Maykel “Osorbo” Castillo and Louis Manuel Otero Alcantara, the leaders of the San Isidro Movement and the artists of “Patria y Vida,” as well as the hundreds of demonstrators who were arrested .

The U.S. should form an international coalition of democratic nations that condemns communist Cuba for its crimes against humanity, past and present, and steps up international pressure for a free Cuba.

It may seem that a Cuba libre is not possible, but we must remember East Germany and the boast of its communist boss that the wall would stand for another century. The widespread July 11 demonstrations including the amazing popularity of “Patria y Vida” signaled that Cuba is at the beginning of the end of the communism that has oppressed it for six decades.

Our Response:

This is not going away. See a good summary of the song Patria y Vida HERE

November 1, 2021

Arbitrary Detention and Short Term Imprisonment

The government continues to employ arbitrary detention to harass and intimidate critics, independent activists, political opponents, and others. From January through August 2020, there were 1,028 arbitrary detentions, according to the Cuban Human Rights Observatory, a Madrid-based human rights organization.

Security officers rarely present arrest warrants to justify detaining critics. In some cases, detainees are released after receiving official warnings, which prosecutors can use in subsequent criminal trials to show a pattern of “delinquent” behavior.

Detention or the threat of detention is often used to prevent people from participating in peaceful marches or meetings to discuss politics. Detainees are often beaten, threatened, and held incommunicado for hours or days. Police or state security agents routinely harass, rough up, and detain members of the Ladies in White (Damas de Blanco)—a group founded by the wives, mothers, and daughters of political prisoners—before or after they attend Sunday mass.

In May, activist and lawyer Enix Berrio Sardá was detained for violating Covid-19-related movement restrictions, when he was presenting a constitutional challenge to Decree-Law 370/2018.

In June, authorities detained or threatened to detain scores of people to prevent a demonstration against police violence in Havana. Police harassed at least 80 people, calling them or showing up at their homes to warn them not to attend the protest. In some cases, officers waited outside people’s homes all day on the day of the protest to prevent them from leaving. At least 50 people were arrested while trying to head to protest sites and temporarily detained. Some were accused of “spreading the epidemic.”

On September 8, authorities detained or threatened to detain scores of people across the country to suppress pro-democracy protests planned to coincide with an important religious festival. Journalists and pro-democracy activists reported police stationed outside their homes that morning, and opposition groups reported scores of people detained, including José Daniel Ferrer, founder and leader of the Cuban Patriotic Union, the main opposition party and largest and most active pro-democracy group on the island.

Our Response:

Right now, we have Americans being held in prison for January 6th demonstrations. They are being held without comment. Why is this any different than what is happening in Cuba? Very dangerous. And 90 ,miles away, he truth is, the Cuban people are at risk every single day. at the whims of their Communist leadership. . 

Copyright 2021 Real Second Chance, Inc.

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